Cold, Hard Facts are a Runner’s Best Friend

The good: my hamstring that sidelined me last month is totally better! I rehabbed and cross-trained like a pro and followed my doctor’s orders to a T as I gradually introduced running back into my routine over several weeks. I missed out on indoor track, but still have my sights set on some later spring races including the Corvallis Half Marathon and Bloomsday Run.

The bad: my opposite leg is now giving me trouble in a weird way, and I have no idea what’s wrong. It’s a completely foreign feeling. I’m getting it checked out this week. I’m hesitant to write about this at all, because then my imperfect leg is no longer my little secret. If I don’t talk about it it isn’t real! Yeah…

The ugly: my feelings surrounding this new, unknown thing going on with my leg include but are not limited to extreme anxiety (How long will this put me out before it gets better? Will I be able to race this spring or even this year?), hopelessness (How will I ever reach my long term goals if I can’t even reach my short term goals?), a sense of failure (I did this to myself!), and envy of healthy runners (They’re meant to run and you’re not!). It’s a dark and terrible downward spiral.

My first instinct is to stick my head in the sand and pretend nothing is wrong and continue with my training. I ran ten miles of trails earlier today under a glorious, sunny sky with a teammate and all was fine. Actually, all of my runs have been “fine”. I’m not in pain and I’m not hobbling around, but I know my body well enough to know that something isn’t right. My inclination after initial denial is to assume the absolute worst; that I’ve done irreparable damage and I’ll never run again without something going wrong. When facing uncertainty it’s easy to project the most extreme scenarios and believe they’ll come true. Hopefully in a couple days I’ll get some answers, face the facts whatever they may be, and come up with a solid plan for what to do next. Until then, rest and breathe!

Save

Don’t Panic

Last Friday I met some friends at the local high school track in the wee hours of the morning for a speed workout. It was dark, 40ºF, and midway through it started to rain. The whole ordeal seemed very Oregonian. I haven’t actually looked back on my splits until now, so here’s how it went (you may recognize this as a modified version of the Michigan):

1600m @ 10K – 6:18 / lap rest

1 road mile steady – 6:54 / 100m rest

1200m @ 10K – 4:41 / lap rest

1 road mile steady – 6:42 / 100m rest

800m @ 10K – 3:06 / lap rest

1 road mile steady – 6:43 / 100m rest

400m @ FAO – 76 / DONE

It was a monster workout! There wasn’t pressure to hit a certain pace other than going by a 10K effort for the track portions and an even effort for the road miles. The constant switching gears from “steady” to “race pace” was what made it really tough. Toward the end I could feel my stomach starting to churn, something that often happens in a race situation, but hard to mimic otherwise. So, well done, coach! Continue reading “Don’t Panic”

January Blues

January is typically the toughest month of the year for me. Daylight hours are few which affects my mood and productivity. I feel out of sorts from the aftermath of the holiday sugar overload and I feel out of shape because I’m not in any sort of peak training. Every year I know it’s coming and every year it happens, though this year has been one of the better so far. Part of that has not been overwhelming myself with new resolutions then feeling terrible for not accomplishing them. Rather, I’ve been taking everything one day at a time and simply doing my best.

While I haven’t made any specific resolutions for this year, I’m continuing with some themes that resonated with me last year: consistency and grace. Committing to being consistent and outlining specific daily and weekly goals really helped my accountability with training in 2016. I reached my goal of running 2600 miles in the year, an average of 50 miles per week. Leading up to the Chicago Marathon last October, I had this realization that I had been being really hard on myself through my training and had been putting too many expectations on myself and that one day. I felt that instead I needed to be gentle with myself and give myself grace. That became super relevant because I got to a point in the marathon where I wanted to quit because I was hurting badly and falling behind around mile 17. I gave myself permission to stop, collect myself, and run it in to the finish at a sustainable pace rather than bail. I’m more proud of earning that Chicago Marathon medal than any other.

I still want to pick a new theme going into the new year. There’s one thing I’m always afraid of going into a race, and that is to let it hurt! I’m not talking about pushing through an injury, but running through typical race pain. I always try to do the best I can while remaining as comfortable as possible. My reasoning is that I want to save something for the end and avoid burning out. This strategy is okay to an extent, but by not taking any risks I’ve rarely reached a point where I’ve truly found my edge. I can think back to an instance last year when I was in a later stage of a local race and nearly caught up to someone that had always finished leagues ahead of me. I was having a great day and she was likely having a rough day. I began to close the gap between us, but something held me back. I was scared to pass her because I didn’t know if I could do that and maintain my pace to the finish. I also somehow felt I shouldn’t pass her out of respect, like it would be a low blow on someone already having a bad day. I didn’t attempt to pass her, and it’s very likely she would have rallied and beat me anyway, but I’ll never know what would have happened had I tried. I wish I had just gone for it. All that being said, this year my goal is to take bigger risks and let it hurt a little! Perhaps that is a bit counter-intuitive with my grace theme… but I believe it’s possible to have both.

I updated my race schedule with an outline of my first half of the year. I’m kicking off the season next week with some indoor track, repeating some of my favorite races from last year including the Corvallis Half Marathon and Bloomsday 12K, and capping it all off with the historic Grandma’s Marathon in June!

In another news, I recently got to chat with Lindsey Hein on her podcast I’ll Have Another. Lindsey is a marathon runner, running coach, and mom. I remember first learning about her and her incredibly moving story when she graced the cover of Women’s Running Magazine. She was so sweet to chat with and we covered all kinds of topics from my life growing up with music, my first sub-3 marathon, and how running and music intersect in my life. We also talked my experience at the Grammys last year and talents and woes of Mariah Carey, Taylor Swift, and Adele. You can listen to the episode here as well as on iTunes.

Enough typing for now- it’s time to bust out the spikes and hit the (snow covered) track!

Save

Poised and Ready

This year has been all about getting back on my feet and better than ever after ending 2015 with a bout of pneumonia and a cracked rib. I had a breakthrough in the Corvallis Half Marathon this spring and knocked a few seconds off my 5K PR this summer.  I had high hopes for the Chicago Marathon but it chewed me up and spit me out. Even so, I came out of it in one piece. It was exactly one year ago that I was at my worst. Today I feel recovered, healthy, and ready to roll into the new year.

This past Sunday I decided for no other reason than wanting to make my week’s mileage a round 45 (okay and maybe to run off some pumpkin pie), that I wanted to run 15 miles for my long run. It was one of those runs that can only be described as perfect. I zipped through the first three miles by myself on a caffeine high then met a friend for the remaining 12. After the buzz wore off, I felt as if I were just floating along effortlessly. As fatigue set in toward the later miles, I felt compelled to sink my teeth into the run more and find my edge. There was something almost primal about it, the way running an unseemly distance through the woods made me feel powerful and free.

The first six weeks or so after the Chicago Marathon, even after a break, I couldn’t run without a new thing bothering me every day. A tight hip flexor, an achy knee, a strained ankle. I told my coach I felt as if I’d aged and he told me he was offended by that statement. OK, poor choice of words- I suppose I felt like a 31-year-old that practically busted her leg finishing a marathon! The best part about my long run, and the past week or two really, was that not an ache, twinge, or ounce of soreness was felt.

Even though it’s just November 29th, I feel as if I’m writing one of those year-end wrap up posts. I think it’s because I can’t stop thinking about the future. I’m hungry for what’s next. But the year’s not over! In fact, I’m heading down to San Francisco this weekend with three good friends for some trail adventures at The North Face Endurance Challenge. For a long time I had been planning to run the 50K. It would have been my first one. However, with recovery not going exactly as planned after Chicago and with all of my big goals for 2017 and beyond, I worried the risk for injury and another long recovery period would be too great. I would have been running the 50K simply to finish, whereas my goals for shorter distances in the new year are much more concrete and meaningful to me. So in place of the 50K on Saturday, December 3rd, I registered for the Endurance Challenge Half Marathon on Sunday, December 4th. Since it’s on trails with some pretty major climbs and descents, I don’t have a certain time goal. My hope is to hone into the same strength and freedom I felt in my run last weekend… plus a little competitive fire for good measure.

Save

Ode to the Turkey Trot

Every Thanksgiving I’ve spent in Portland I’ve made the trek across the Columbia River to take part in Vancouver’s Clark County Turkey Trot. Thinking back on what initially drew me to this event in 2009 as a newly married college grad, it might have been the enticing low entry fee. What I found at the event was a festive small town vibe, a flast course (okay, that was me trying to type flat and fast at the same time. I left it because it kinds of works, right?), and an emphasis on the spirit of giving with 100% of the race proceeds going to the local food bank. The organizers stressed that it’s meant to be a FUN 5K and 10K, though they still invited faster runners to the front and offered small awards to the top finishers.

That first year, I went out fast and ran an all time best of 19:07. And I won! I was exhilarated. André came with me to cheer me on and take photos. Then we went home and prepared our first Thanksgiving feast ever. It was the beginning of new traditions.

Clark County Turkey Trot 2009.jpeg
Clark County Turkey Trot 2009
Thanksgiving 2009.jpeg
Thanksgiving 2009
thanksgiving josiah liz andre.jpeg
Had to dig deep in the facebook archives for this one. Me with Andre (right) and my brother-in-law Josiah.

The next year in 2010, we went back to Vancouver, this time with my mother-in-law Elizabeth, and we both ran the Turkey Trot. That time I placed second but I ran a new personal best of 19:00. And again, we went home and prepared a magnificent Thanksgiving meal.

63269_10150106007760120_8071436_n.jpeg
Side by side with my college track teammate Randy. He lost his life to cancer less than three years later. I’m glad we could share that moment.
Clark County Turkey Trot 2010.jpeg
Clark County Turkey Trot 2010
Thanksgiving 2010.jpeg
Thanksgiving 2010

Somehow, six years flew by and it took me that long to return to Clark County on Thanksgiving Day. Some years André and I were traveling, last year we were on tour with RAC, and I think another year we were home but I might have been injured and unable to run. Regardless, 2016 rolled around and I was ready for my Clark County Comeback.

This time one of my besties Shasta joined me for the 5K. André and Alex, Shasta’s boyfriend were on cheer duty and puppy duty as Alex and Shasta were puppysitting for the holiday. It was cold, it was wet, it was the pacific northwest at its best on Thanksgiving Day. Shasta and I went out pretty fast with a good small group, mostly men, hitting the mile mark right around 5:55. The effort felt relaxed and I felt light on my feet. It had been a few months since I’d run so fast. I was having fun! After the turn around at the halfway point, I lost most of my group because many continued on as they were running the 10K distance. I was pretty much alone at that point. There were one or two men ahead of me. My breathing was getting more labored. I was getting tired. There were hundreds of participants going out the way I’d come that I had to dodge on the way back as were sharing only a bike path. I splashed through some mud puddles. Some participants cheered for me as I went by and I smiled and waved. I had definitely eased up on the pace, and looking back I could have been a little more tough. But I wasn’t feeling tough. It was Thanksgiving Day and I was happy to be out there and happy to be in the lead. I zipped around the final corner to the finish, smiled at the volunteers and spectators clapping and cheering me in, and crossed the line in 19:24. Shasta finished soon after in 19:48, close to (if not) a personal best!

_DSF0661.jpg
So close to the finish!
_DSF0665.jpg
Alex cheering on Shasta
_DSF0669.jpg
Team Lurz and Sheesta
IMG_1355.JPG
Found my Volée teammate Angela at the finish. She ran a new personal best of 25:48!

Per tradition, even with the six(!) year hiatus, we went home, dried off, and made a spectacular Thanksgiving feast.

Thanksgiving 2016.jpeg

15230758_10100253503235805_603694975830727121_n.jpeg

thanksgiving feast 2016.jpeg

Save